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The Religious Man Of Tomorrow Will Be A Mystic, Or He Will No Longer Be

1 year ago · By J.D. King · 1 Min Read
#healing  #ministry 

Christianity in the West “is increasingly becoming secularized, nominal, and even hostile to historic Christian confessions.”[1] For many Protestant leaders, biblical passages that relate to healing or supernatural works “seem mildly embarrassing.”[2] They feel that these texts should be either ignored or reformulated.

They are not cognizant that third-world beliefs and practices—“dripping with reactionary supernaturalism”—are succeeding, while Western “experiments with secularized religion have generally failed.”[3]

Most have not noticed that Christianity's center of gravity has shifted. In this era, a “global Christian revolution” is taking place “outside the Western world.” [4] Influence and statistical growth are most evident where there is a greater openness to the gifts of the Spirit.

Philosopher Peter Kreeft acknowledges that one does not “see many miracles in Europe.” However, “enormous miracles” are currently being reported “in Africa and China. Christianity is growing by leaps and bounds there.”[5]

In these places, the “stories of miracles and healing are so self-evidently crucial to the Christian message that some suspicion must be attached to any church that lacked these signs of power.”[6]

Surprisingly, many Christians in the impoverished, majority world are convinced that the churches in Europe and North America have fallen below the basic biblical standard.

Throughout the nations, there is great concern about the West.

The words of theologian Karl Rahner are apt. He has surmised that the “religious man of tomorrow will be a mystic, someone who has experienced God, or else he will no longer be.”[7]

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[1] Timothy C. Tennent, Theology in the Context of World Christianity (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2007), 105.

[2] Philip Jenkins, The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 2011), 161.

[3] Peter Berger, The Desecularization of the World: Resurgent Religion and World Politics (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1999), 4.

[4] Timothy C. Tennent, Theology in the Context of World Christianity (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan, 2007), 11.

[5] Peter Kreeft, with Dave Nevins, Charisms: Visions, Tongues, Healing, Etc. (Pennsauken, New Jersey: BookBaby, 2013), 13. MacCulloch notes, “Europe, far from setting the pattern for the world in secularization, has proven the exception to the worldwide reassertion of religion.” Diarmaid MacCulloch, All Things Made New: The Reformation and Its Legacy (New York: Oxford University Press, 2016), 2.

[6] Philip Jenkins, The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity (New York: Oxford University Press, 2002, 2011), 161.

[7] Karl Rahner, Theological Investigations (Baltimore: Helicon Press, 2001), 22.


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